Ethos anthropos daimoN
Heraclitus

 Photo by Alex Hofford, made during Shark Rescue's launch on 9 August 2009.

Photo by Alex Hofford, made during Shark Rescue's launch on 9 August 2009.

 

Character is Fate – Heraclitus

What if the work we do and the experiences we have are expressions of our character and values? 

Well duh – they are. We're the result of luck in the genetic lottery, experiences and their interpretations to shape future behaviour, and being at the right place at the right time.

If you would like to review Ran’s bio, Click here…

 

The 12 Dimensions of a Service Leader 

Life – it’s about providing personal service. We are all service providers to the people in our lives. By reviewing and improving the 12 dimensions that inform our service leadership – the expression of who we are – we can improve the quality of our service to ourselves and others. This enhances how we come across, strengthens our leadership, and improves how competitive we are in all our activities.  Read more...

Celebrating Hong Kong’s DNA

From June to July 2018, the Global Institute for Tomorrow (GIFT) ran their Young Leader’s Program. This brought 26 professionals from government, NGOs and commercial organizations to explore what makes Hong Kong unique in the world. This work was co-sponsored by my client, Po Chung, and resulted in a report that all of Hong Kong and others can use to better plan for the future. This is a powerful insider’s view of what makes Hong Kong special and how policymakers can create a vision for the future. Service Detox Consulting offered support services throughout. To explore this critical document, please Click here…


Lesson Six

It was Christmas Day. My wife, Delian, and I were learning how to surf. We’d just completed the fifth of our six introductory lessons at the Easy Beach surfing guesthouse in Ahangama, Sri Lanka. We ordered pre-dinner drinks and enjoyed the sunset from the porch. The waves crashed and lapped against the shore. Two traveling surfers, Ollie and Matt, joined us. They ordered pints of Lion lager, and welcomed our surf-related questions.  Read more...

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A Line in the Sand as a Call to Action

On 12 August 2009 Shark Rescue drew a line in the sand, issuing a call on the Hong Kong Government to ban the consumption and sale of shark products in Hong Kong. While active, Shark Rescue was among the first of many passionate groups in Hong Kong and around the world to recognize the importance of protecting sharks and our oceans. Our launch was the first time someone held a shark-specific protest in Hong Kong, the global hub of the shark trade. In August 2016, Shark Rescue was retired. 

  • See Shark Rescue's launch here

  • Read about Shark Rescue's approach here

  • Read from Shark Rescue on CNN here

  • Read from Shark Rescue in Annimiticus here

  • Read from Shark Rescue in the SCMP

  • Read about racing for shark-awareness here

  • View a video made on Shark Rescue at Moontrekker here

  • View the gallery of Shark Rescue photos here

 


High Time to Sea

“The vigia radioed this morning to say he saw some fins. We’ll head there first, make a little tour, and see if we can find ourselves some whales.” I look up from the nautical map and smile at Chris Beer, the red-bearded cheery captain of the Physeter. The vessel is a whale-watching and scientific two-hull catamaran, and for part of the year, Chris and his wife Lisa lead scientific expeditions into the Azorean waters.  Read more...

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350 Rans and the Happy Accident 

I described my photographic project and Bruce hits the nail on the head. “That isn’t a photo series,” he says, “it’s is a performance.” We’re at La Pampa, an Argentinean restaurant on Staunton Street. Savouring a bite, he chuckles. “It’s vain and self-centered. But it’s bold. I like it.”

He’s right, 350 Rans isn’t a photo project as much as it’s a six-and-a-half-year performance.  Read more...


We Need to Talk

Like an immigrant in my hometown, I’ve gradually seen a bias hiding in plain sight. Until recently, I was blind to what I call the compression of income. At first, it sounds like this is another way of talking about inflation, but the point is there’s something subtle going on that no one’s talking about. The effect of this bias means people are suffering without understanding another cause of that pain.   Read more...